Black Looks - Including an African LGBTIQ+ Archive

Africa , Human Rights, Queer Politics

Breakdown on UN vote to exclude LGBTI from condemnation of execution

UPDATE: The news is that this is back on the agenda again and they are meeting to reconsider the application

Last week the UN General Assembly Human Rights Committee voted to delete specific reference to killings due to sexual orientation from a resolution condemning unjustified executions.

The resolution urges States to protect the right to life of all people, including by calling on states to investigate killings based on discriminatory grounds. For the past 10 years, the resolution has included sexual orientation in the list of discriminatory grounds on which killings are often based.

The removed reference was originally contained in a non-exhaustive list in the resolution highlighting the many groups of people that are particularly targeted by killings – including persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities, persons acting as human rights defenders (such as lawyers, journalists or demonstrators) as well as street children and members of indigenous communities. Mentioning sexual orientation as a basis on which people are targeted for killing highlights a situation in which particular vigilance is required in order for all people to be afforded equal protection.

Below is a breakdown and comparison of 2010 vote with similar vote in 2008: Via FARUganda

1. Improvement of position:

(i) Opposed sexual orientation inclusion in 2008, abstained in 2010:

Belarus, Fiji


2. Worsening of position:

(i) supported sexual orientation inclusion in 2008, abstained in 2010:

Cape Verde, Colombia, Fiji, Mauritius, Philippines, Vanuatu

(ii) abstained in 2008, opposed sexual orientation inclusion in 2010:

Angola, Bahamas, Botswana, Burundi, Ethiopia, Haiti, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Namibia, Rwanda, United Republic of Tanzania


3. Ambiguous, some improvement of position:

(i) Did not vote in 2008, supported sexual orientation inclusion in 2010:

Micronesia, Monaco, Samoa


4. Ambiguous, some worsening of position

(i) did not vote in 2008, opposed sexual orientation inclusion in 2010:

Afghanistan, Algeria, Côte d’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ghana, Grenada, Guyana, Mozambique, Myanmar, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Somalia, Suriname

(ii) supported sexual orientation inclusion in 2008, did not vote in 2010:

Albania, Bolivia, Honduras, Turkey

B. Comparison of 2010 vote on sexual orientation reference in EJE resolution with 2008 GA joint statement on human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity:

1. Improvement of position:

(i) did not support the 2008 GA joint statement but did support retaining the reference to sexual orientation in the EJE resolution :

Bhutan, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, India, Micronesia, Monaco, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Samoa, Ukraine

(ii) supported the Syrian 2008 counterstatement, but abstained on the amendment to remove sexual orientation from the EJE resolution:

Fiji

2. Worsening of position :

(i) supported the 2008 GA joint statement, but voted against sexual orientation inclusion in the EJE resolution :

Cuba

(ii) supported the 2008 GA joint statement, but abstained on sexual orientation inclusion in the EJE resolution :

Cape Verde, Colombia, Mauritius

3. Ambiguous, some improvement of position:

(i) supported the Syrian 2008 counterstatement, but did not vote on the amendment to remove sexual orientation from the EJE resolution:

Chad, Gambia, Guinea, Mauritania, Solomon Islands, Togo, Turkmenistan

4. Ambiguous, some worsening of position :

(i) supported the 2008 GA joint statement, but did not vote on sexual orientation inclusion in the EJE resolution :

Albania, Bolivia, Central African Republic, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Nicaragua, Sao Tome and Principe

7 Comments

  1. GoldfishGirl

    It is so sad that we are going backwards on this. It appalls me that people would vote to take ANY group of people off that list.

  2. Sokari

    Yes and especially if one reads this together with the recent refusal to grant observer status to CAL by the African Commission on People and Human Rights

    The Good news is that there is to be another vote. I need to add that

  3. Keguro

    Sokari,

    Thanks for keeping tabs on this and the breakdown of what is happening. It is very interesting–though not unexpected.

    Keguro

  4. Pavelserboris

    Where could one find the voting record and who exactly voted this down not just countries but the names of their representatives in the UN.

  5. Sokari

    This I dont know. I guess one would have to know the names of each country representative on the committee.

  6. jwhyap

    Those countries listed above as having voted sit on Committee Three. You can find their representatives here:
    http://www.un.org/en/members/index.shtml
    Unfortunately I do not know an easier way than to go to each country’s website, but I am going to try and email some of them, particularly those who have changed their position (either for the worse or better)

  7. Sokari

    Thanks that is an excellent idea. I will check out the link and post on Twitter and FB.