The aid game – laundering the profits of exploitation

Aid agencies, NGO’s are being outed for their role as agents of Western financial captial at any cost who feed of the misery caused by their masters. Christian Aid is one such example. Following the 2004 coup against President Aristide of Haiti, Christian Aid issued a position statement in which it colluded with the lies of the US and France that Aristide resigned when in fact he was kidnapped and dumped in the Central African Republic. The paper went on to present Aristide’s government as a corrupt bunch of thugs whilst completing ignoring the fact that he won two elections with over 75% of the vote. They continued to ignore the violence committed by the UN forces following the removal of Aristide plus the systematic terrorising of Lavalas supporters. All this done under the disguise of “humanitarian concerns”. After assisting in the destruction of an elected government by bleeding it dry it then calls for aid to rebuild the very structures it has prevented from developing by the elected government. The people, in this case Haitians then become the objects of NGO industry which is based on the premise that there is a disaster or a conflict which enables them to step in and “save” the situation. This in turn is driven by adverts of helpless hapless people with no agency as victims of something that is disconnected from the financiers of the NGO’s themselves and Western financial interests.

Governments view humanitarian aid as a strategic battleground where their military forces can operate alongside doctors, to the great displeasure of the doctors. Multilateral organisations, such as the European Union, finance largescale programmes; the UN funds peacekeeping operations. All these players flood the poorest countries, overlap and fail to coordinate with each other, creating chaos rather than order.

Governments and multilateral organisations cannot allow voluntary organisations to have a monopoly on solidarity and generosity. So humanitarian work has become a world of populist politicians; tired, concerned professionals; international funders caught in a bureaucratic, financial rationale; and suspicious or blasé donors who prefer local causes. The circus follows the show — the misfortune of others — a media product in ever greater demand.

The media is busy reporting endless tragedies in Haiti – floods, hurricanes, collapsing schools. What they do not report is what iis behind these disasters. Why is it when the hurricane hits Haiti, thousands die yet in neighbouring Dominican Republic the numbers are in their tens and twenties? The $1 million Haiti pays back in debt payments every week which the West refuses to write off but is happy to spend millions on UN peacekeepers and the huge overhead costs of NGO’s and humanitarian aid thereby maintaining it’s control and occupation of the country.

In Haiti: Racism & Poverty, John Maxwell makes some comparisons between the amount of money paid out in bonus payments to Wall St bankers $18 billion – double Haiti’s GDP (8 million people).

The chairman of Goldman took home more than $70 million and his lieutenants — as Zoellick once was — $40 million or more, each.
It should be clear that someone like Robert Zoellick is likely to be totally bemused by Haiti when his entertainment allowance could probably feed the entire population for a day or two. It is not hard to understand that Mr Zoellick cannot understand why Haiti needs debt relief.

One million dollars a week would feed everybody in Haiti even if only at a very basic level — at least they would not have to eat earth patties. Instead the Haitians export this money to pay the salaries of such as Zoellick

But debt relief is too simple and at the same time to complicated to process. There are NGOs to rebuild what Western governments and multinationals destroy and NGOs to prop up the regimes that the US and multinationals wish to keep in place to maintain their financial interests and NGOs to spread the deceit that is charitable capitalism….

The aid industry is central to the current globalisation of ideology. Global capitalism must launder the profits from its exploitation. The harsh demands of this unregulated world — child labour, increased production, unpaid overtime — must be disguised. The huge number of people who suffer from these forms of social violence are rarely identified as victims. Governments, businesses and donors are paying a moral tax, trying to claim they are part of a moral humanity, through their pledges of morality, pseudo-transparency and charity.

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